THE TRICORN FOUNDATION

Providing scholarships                        
to graduates of                        
The Colonial Williamsburg                        
Fifes & Drums                        

 


 About Us
 

  Mission Statement

  The Corporation

  Leadership

  Emeritus

  Special 
     Acknowledgements

The Colonial Williamsburg
Fifes & Drums
And
The Tricorn Foundation

     The Tricorn Foundation was established in 2006 to provide scholarships for graduating seniors of the Colonial Williamsburg Fifes & Drums.


Colonial Williamsburg Foundation,1980 

     The Tricorn Foundation is proud of the current Corps members and their contributions to the rich legacy of the Corps and to Colonial Williamsburg.

     In January of 2008, Tricorn awarded its first scholarships of $2000 each.  Click here to learn about the 2008 recipients.

     The Corps was formed in 1958 with a handful of fifers and drummers.  With the arrival of George Carroll in 1961 as the Corps' first Drum Major and Musick Master, the Corps was organized into a Junior and Senior Corps with a rank structure still in use today.  With its beating drums, trilling fifes and colorful uniforms, the Corps became one of the most recognized symbols of Colonial Williamsburg.  The world renowned Corps are musical ambassadors for the restored 18th century town.  The Corps consists of a Junior Corps of approximately 40 to 50 members and a Senior Corps of approximately 40 members.

          The scholarships primarily are based on merit within the Corps, to recognize the hard work and dedication required to graduate from the Corps.  To become a graduate the young men and women typically will spend eight years in the Corps.  Most enter the Corps at the age of ten or eleven (fourth or fifth grade).  They enter the Junior Corps as Recruits and progress through the ranks of Private, Fifer/Drummer, Corporal, Sergeant, Fife/Drum Sergeant and Sergeant Major.

     It takes about four to five years to move from the Junior Corps to the Senior Corps.  Junior Corps members receive two periods of instruction and participate in a full rehearsal each week.  While in the Junior Corps, the members will perform in hundreds of marches and performances.  

     Senior Corps members assume leadership positions as reflected in the ranks of Fife Sergeant, Drum Sergeant and Sergeant Major.  They also train the Junior Corps.  While in the Senior Corps the members will participate in hundreds of marches and performances each year.  Senior Corps members also have a busy travel schedule, performing in special events around the country.  The Corps has performed for a wide variety of events and dignitaries including Presidents of the United States and foreign leaders.  

     Over the years the Corps also has produced several recordings of 18th century music.  Currently there are five CDs available for purchase: Marching Out of Time; Echoes of the Revolution; The World Turned Upside Down; the 4th of July Concert: The Fifes and Drums of Colonial Williamsburg and A Grand Entertainment.  These CDs may be purchase from Colonial Williamsburg at the following link, The Williamsburg Marketplace.  Colonial Williamsburg also has produced a DVD on fifing and drumming in America that went on sale in May in 2008.  Included with the DVD is a 50th anniversary CD of tunes recorded by the Corps over the years.  During the Drummer's Call weekend of April 18-19, 2007, Corps alumni recorded several selections that were included on the 50th anniversary CD.  Performing on the 2007 alumni recording were four fifers and two drummers who performed on the Corps' first record album recorded in 1968.


2007

     The uniforms of the Corps represent those of the Virginia State Garrison Regiment, which was authorized by the Virginia General Assembly in May 1778 to defend the eastern portion of Virginia, especially the capital at Williamsburg, during the American Revolution.  Since 1974 the Corps has worn the regimental uniform of the Virginia State Garrison Regiment.  Though often mistaken for British uniforms because of their red coats with blue facings, musicians of 18th-century regiments wore colors that were the reverse of those worn by line soldiers so they were easily distinguishable on the battlefield.  Infantrymen of the Virginia State Garrison Regiment wore blue coats with red facings.

     The present Corps follows 18th-century practice of using school-aged children with the exception of the drum major.  Field musicians were vital to military commanders as the sole means of relaying orders during battle.  Other duties included beating of duty calls throughout the day, which informed company members of the time and duties to be performed.

     Whenever companies were mustered into regiments, company musicians were similarly massed into field musick corps.  In this formation they were responsible, under the drum major's direction, for marching the regiment in proper cadence and for beating daily ceremonies such as the Reveille, the General, the Assembly, the Retreat and the Tattoo.

     Military musicians served another important purpose during the Revolution providing evening entertainment for their companions and at impromptu dances.  Today, individual corps members serve the same role by playing 18th-century music for visitors throughout the Colonial Williamsburg Historic Area.

     Established in 1926, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is the not-for-profit educational institution that preserves and operates the restored 18th-centurey capital of Virginia.  Williamsburg is located 150 miles south of Washington D.C., off Interstate 64.  For more information or reservations, call toll-free 1-800-HISTORY or visit Colonial Williamsburg on the Internet at www.colonialwilliamsburg.com.

 

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2009 The Tricorn Foundation